How to spot a fake news story

A fake news article that was posted on a satirical website on Wednesday has been shared hundreds of times on social media.

The article appeared on the website of the satirical website of satirical news website, The Onion.

It alleged that an Irish woman had died after an apparent heart attack in Dublin and claimed the case was connected to a planned “Muslim pilgrimage”.

The story was originally published on November 1.

The fake news has since been shared over a thousand times.

“She was found dead at home, and an autopsy showed that she had been strangled, the story said,” it said.

It was shared on Facebook, Twitter and Reddit, and was picked up by a number of other sites including The Onion, which posted the article.

The Irish Examiner has contacted the website’s owner for comment.

The woman’s name was not revealed.

The story, entitled “The Irish woman who died in an apparent cardiac arrest”, was published on Wednesday on the satirical site The Onion’s website, with the headline: “A Woman’s death has been linked to a Muslim pilgrimage”.

A picture of the article was posted online by an unnamed woman, and a video clip of the story, which was posted to Facebook and YouTube, was shared over 700 times by Wednesday afternoon.

The video clip has been viewed more than 8,500 times.

The satirical website said it had contacted the Irish Examiner to report the story as a hoax.

The post has been taken down, but is still available to view at the Irish Tribune.

“It is clearly a hoax, but it still has the potential to be seen as such, especially with the viral nature of fake news,” The Irish Tribune’s editor-in-chief said.

“There is a risk that it will spread through social media and spread to others, and in fact, we have a number people who have reported being contacted by the person behind this story, who said that he was a professional hoaxer and had been contacted by people claiming to be from a Catholic organisation and other organisations.” “

The hoaxer has also allegedly claimed that he had seen the woman’s body at a cemetery and was working to find out where it had been buried. “

There is a risk that it will spread through social media and spread to others, and in fact, we have a number people who have reported being contacted by the person behind this story, who said that he was a professional hoaxer and had been contacted by people claiming to be from a Catholic organisation and other organisations.”

The hoaxer has also allegedly claimed that he had seen the woman’s body at a cemetery and was working to find out where it had been buried.

The hoax is one of the most common hoaxes, according to social media analysis site, Pivotal.

“Fake news and fake-news sites have been around for decades,” said Mr Colbert.

“I think the irony is that it is just a case of a prankster having to deal with the backlash.”